Posted on February 05, 2016, by Robbie Allen

Here at Lobster Pictures we are always looking for exciting ways that time-lapse can show the world from different perspectives.

The 18th century Stourhead estate, with its world-famous landscape gardens, provided the perfect location for one of our Lobster Pot time-lapse cameras.  Indeed, when Stourhead first opened its doors to the public, it was described by a magazine as a “living work of art”.

We partnered with the National Trust, who care for the unique estate, in order to produce a video that documents the passing of summer to autumn, showcasing a spectacular transition in colour and atmosphere.

 

Why Time-Lapse?

Lisa Gledhill, Video Communications Officer for the National Trust, said:

“By using time-lapse we are able to show the passing of the autumn season in a unique way which will interest visitors and hopefully encourage them to visit more than once, to see the subtle changes of colour and light.

“Throughout the process the team at Lobster Pictures provided very high quality customer service and we’re extremely pleased with the quality of the final film and photo package.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Challenging Install

Lisa also commented on some of the challenges of setting up the camera in such a remote area:

“The installation of the time-lapse camera at Stourhead proved particularly tricky as the area chosen has no mobile phone, Wi-Fi or direct network coverage.  There were also no direct lines-of-sight to the nearest network connection point.

“We were very impressed with the ingenuity of Lobster’s technical team who were determined not to be beaten and found clever ways to overcome all the difficulties.”

Barney Livingston explained how it all started with the key issue of having no mobile phone signal.  This meant we wouldn’t be able to control the camera, or upload the images to our proprietary monitoring tool and web interface, Lobster Vision:

“Instead, we tried to wire the camera directly into the office building’s internet connection, but there were too many trees in the way.”

“To overcome this, we set up a long range wireless network with two legs which went across the lake.

“This wasn’t the only issue.  There was also a severe lack of power sources, but we managed to find one in the ticket office."

Fortunately, figuring out how to solve challenging issues such as these is one of the things we enjoy most at Lobster Pictures!

“It was a great pleasure working at Stourhead,” said Luke Slater, one of our senior technicians who was involved in the project.

“I especially enjoyed installing a wireless network that featured relays in a tree, ticket booth and an 18th century folly. This enabled people to view the images live online.”   

Can you spot Luke and the Lobster Pot?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Changing Colours of Autumn

Thanks to the hard work and dedication of all those involved, we were able to upload and view the images captured at Stourhead as they came in.

This particular project was also made available to the public, which meant anybody with internet access could watch it unfold.  The images are still available on Lobster Vision, so feel free to take a look at the various monitoring tools we provide!

Of course, we’ll let you be the judge of the final time-lapse video we produced.  Check out the video below, and don’t hesitate to get in touch if you think we could help you with your next project!

For more information on Stourhead and its rich history, visit the National Trust website.